Everyday Adventures in Havachon Heaven

The Good, Crazy, & Adorable Life of One Havachon Puppy

Here we are again…

I can’t believe it’s been two months since I’ve posted. It hasn’t been because we’re having a great time or traveling the globe – things have been a bit rough in Daisyville for a while, and we had a scare with Daisy just the other day too.

I'm sorry I scared you, Mommy.

I’m sorry I scared you, Mommy.

I’ll get through the nasty stuff quickly because let’s face it – who wants to read someone else’s moans and groans? Here’s what’s been going on, at hyperspeed:

  1. DH’s position was eliminated (along with a number of others) and he was unemployed for over 7 months.
  2. Because of that, I took on a LOT of extra freelance work. I had very little time for the blogging world…or anything else, for that matter.
  3. My knee reached epic proportions of pain and decided to include my thigh joint and ankle in the fun, as well as my other knee. It literally got worse every day, and I reached a point where I could hardly walk at all and was in pain just sitting still. This went on for four months while I saw different doctors, none of whom had an answer.
  4. Because all other doctors failed me, giving me wrong diagnoses (which would have resulted in major unnecessary surgery) as well as a perfectly unacceptable diagnosis that I would never be able to go up stairs or even a curb again, I went outside the box to a functional medicine doctor 2 days a week. He’s an hour away (2 hours round trip travel time when there were no traffic delays plus 1-2 hours spent there) which totally killed those two days for me. So…
  5. I’d end up working into the night and on weekends.

And now…

  1. DH has a new job in a completely different field, which is quite interesting for him.
  2. I’m still doing a lot of extra freelance work, but not quite as much as I was.
  3. The functional medicine doctor turned out to be the only one with the right answer, and now my knees are much better. After six months of testing, treatments and supplements, I’m going up stairs with no problem and only have a little bit of pain when I squat fully down, but at least I can get onto the floor again now. And I’m sure that remaining pain will pass eventually, but even if it doesn’t, I’m FULLY FUNCTIONAL again.
  4. I still work on some nights and some weekends, but it’s not an every day thing anymore.

Whew. It was a rough period of time. And those are just the highlights!

And the other day, Daisy decided to give us a good scare. She suddenly couldn’t lie down and kept walking in slow circles, then she’d stare at me with sad eyes and sit up against me – her sure sign that something’s wrong. When she’d finally lie down, it was very carefully and with a groan. Then she’d keep her neck sticking out like a cow. She wouldn’t sit, lie or walk on anything soft at all, which are her favorite places. Not even on a flat blanket, and she’d stare longingly at her crate, which she loves to nap in.

When she'd finally get down to the floor with a groan, she stayed frozen in this position.

When she’d finally get down to the floor with a groan, she stayed frozen in this position. She couldn’t sleep even though she was clearly tired and didn’t move a muscle until she had to.

 

Watching all her symptoms, it appeared she was having pain in her neck or upper back. The surgeon said another back problem could develop out of the blue, you can never tell and there may seem to be no reason for it because it can be a degenerative thing. But this was less than a year after her last harrowing surgery. I was so upset for her and prepping for a run to the vet.

That evening we took her for her usual walk, and suddenly she started acting normally after about eight hours of scary behavior. We have no idea what happened or why it suddenly – and I mean suddenly, like someone flipped a switch – went away, but we’re extremely grateful that it’s gone and she seems fine now. We’re treating her like she’s recovering from a back problem every day now to try to prevent anything. To me, that scary day seemed like a warning.

So in this calm between storms, I’m taking the opportunity to post and visit a bit. Fingers crossed that our bad run is over!

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Canine Disk Surgery Recovery Journal – Neurosurgeon Follow-up Visit (Day 16)

Let’s get right to it – the neurosurgeon was thrilled with Daisy’s progress so far! Especially considering that she was in such iffy condition when we brought her home coupled with the fact that the surgeon had said we should only expect to see small improvements weekly, specifically NOT daily. BUT as you saw in this recovery journal, Daisy did make progress daily, and our little girl surprised even a highly experienced neurosurgeon.

The surgeon asked, “Can she walk a little for me?” DD put Daisy on the floor, and she tore across the room to run and hide behind me! I walked a little so Daisy would walk, and I must say, she put on her best show! The neurosurgeon was impressed with all of her progress. Still, Daisy has to have four more weeks of strict crate rest – we still have to carry her down to the curb to go potty, and no extended walks yet. But those four more weeks are shorter than were expected – it was supposed to be eight weeks of strict crate rest; two weeks were shaved off. 🙂

Her left rear leg did react to testing, which it wasn’t doing before the surgery. And that’s only after two weeks, so it will probably get even stronger and better over time.

AND – no more sling! We can take her on her short walks without using the sling at all – at this point it wasn’t holding her up anyway, it was just there in case she needed it and to give her confidence. Walking her and carrying her in and out will be much easier now.

And we can bathe Daisy and groom her – thank goodness! She’s getting a bit…::ahem::…scented these days…and her hair has gone wild without a trim!

LOOK AT THAT CRAZY BEARD!!

LOOK AT THAT CRAZY BEARD!!

That’s the good news – which is all the most important stuff anyway.

The medium news, which we can adjust to: no rough play, meaning no more tug-o-war, no more chasing toys, no more intense running – EVER. And while we can certainly eliminate those more high-powered activities, it’s going to be a battle getting Daisy to stop. Tug-o-war is her favorite game, and racing like a lunatic through the house is a favorite activity. We can ignore her prompts to play tug-o-war (though it’s hard not playing something with her that we know she loves, especially when she teases us with a toy), but how do we stop her from racing around? Maybe we’ll have to limit her to smaller areas of the house – lots of baby gates will be needed!

Also, though her incision is healing well, the surgeon said she seems to be having a bit of “suture reactivity”, meaning there are little bumps along the incision from the stitches under the skin (possibly an allergic reaction). It’s not bad, though, and we can put either Vitamin E or triple antibiotic cream on it to help it along. She said if we see little ends of stitches popping out through the incision anywhere, “just pull them out” – I think we’ll leave that to DH, he’s much better with icky stuff than we are! Hopefully we won’t have to deal with that anyway.

Peach fuzz is getting longer and softer, but doesn't this remind you of a fire break in the woods? :)

Peach fuzz is getting longer and softer, but doesn’t this remind you of a fire break in the woods? 🙂

The bad news: this could happen again. The surgeon said she’s seen dogs go through 2 or 3 disk surgeries in a lifetime, though it’s not common…but it can still happen. DD asked what we can do to prevent it, and the answer was “Nothing. If it happens again, it’s not your fault – this is a degenerative disk disease.” So while we will limit her activities, the surgeon said she could pop a disk just by stretching or walking off a curb. We’re praying it doesn’t happen again – mostly because we don’t want her going through that agony again, but also because our wallets can’t really handle any more expensive surgeries!

In my view, the good news far outweighs the bad news and the bad part may never happen anyway. So we’re happy, she’s happy, the surgeon is happy – our Christmas will be jolly! 😀

I got a good report from my surgeon - I'm a happy pup again! :D

I got a good report from my surgeon – I’m a happy pup again! 😀

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Canine Disk Surgery Recovery Journal – Day 13

Yet more progress today – Daisy tried to scratch her ear with her left back paw! She actually picked up the paw and made an attempt, but it wasn’t strong enough yet to do the job. So after a few slow, cautious swipes that either didn’t connect or were just too weak, she gave up. DD went over and gave her a good scratching, and did Daisy ever love it! Now I’m more sure than ever that her back leg will regain its strength and ability, and even if it ends up not being quite what it was, it will be enough for her to get around and use it. But hey, only two weeks ago she had NO use of it at all! 😀

And now when one of us comes home and goes straight to Daisy’s crate to pet and calm her, when we open the door she’s actually trying to come out! More good progress.

Cuddling with one of her favorite soft toys

Cuddling with one of her favorite soft toys

We go back to see the neurosurgeon on Monday, and I’m anxious to hear what she says. Daisy does want to walk more, so I hope she says we can do that. I know she’ll still be confined to her crate for another 4-6 weeks, but she’s very interested in her twice daily walks and is trying to walk faster (we’re not letting her do that until we get the okay from the doctor). DD only uses the sling as a precaution now, she doesn’t actually hold Daisy up with it. This little pup is doing it all on her own. 😀 😀

She also did a full shake-off today, and her tail is up again. Always a good sign!

Her favorite crate position  - always with her head on her little pillow. :)

Her favorite crate position – always with her head on her little pillow. 🙂

My wonderful holistic doctor, who has four big super-healthy dogs of his own and has done extensive studies on the dog version of holistic medicine, has given us a lot of good advice along with turmeric and probiotics to put in her food. So I feel like she’s getting the best care from every medical direction. 🙂

And on a lighter note, some peach fuzz is starting to grow in on her shaved back. 🙂 Meanwhile, the rest of her hair is growing out of control! Just wait til that first bath and grooming… 😉

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Canine Disk Surgery Recovery Journal – Day 10

Things are going along well – Daisy peed outside twice again today, and she went back to her normal habit of peeing in several different spots rather than just going once. She’s pooping normally again too – WHEW! I never thought I’d spend so much time focused on a dog’s bathroom habits!

Daisy actually seems to focus on figuring out how to work her now only partially lame leg. Sometimes in her crate, she’ll drag her back half around, then stop and stare at the leg – she seems to be thinking about what to do. Usually she’ll make an attempt at standing in a different way; a couple of times she’s fallen over, and it’s so hard to keep myself from rushing over to help and to stop myself from gasping. But I know I can’t or else she’d become dependent on help and sense my emotions. In the end, she doesn’t seem to get hurt and she always figures out how to work that leg. It’s like watching a little 15-pound miracle. I so admire the instinct and determination in dogs.

She’s back to being Crazy Daisy again – she gets super excited when one of us comes into the house, so now DD has to get down on the floor, open the crate door and try to hold Daisy semi-still while the other of us who just came in hurries to reach in and pet her/calm her. This will be our biggest challenge – trying to keep her from re-injuring herself by getting overly excited to see us. It’s great that she has that joy back, but it’s also dangerous, both now and once she’s out of the crate. We’ve tried many ways in the past to get her to calm down a bit when we come home – she jumps with all four paws off the floor and sometimes spins around; a couple of times she landed in scary ways, though she never yiped. But that has to stop now, I wouldn’t be surprised if all that contributed to her disk problem.

So now that we’re in a relatively calm period (though we still take notice of and celebrate every tiny new improvement), I’d like to post a few pics of us passing your POTP and kindnesses on to Daisy – I know you all helped her healing along…and you still are.

Good morning, Sunshine! :D

Good morning, our little sunshine! 😀

Passing the POTP lovies on to Daisy; she's sending lovies back with a big lick.

Passing your POTP lovies on to Daisy; she’s sending lovies back to you all with a big lick.

Irresistible!

Irresistible!

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Canine Disk Surgery Recovery Journal – Days 8 and 9

TUESDAY SPECIAL PEE-MAIL EDITION!!!!

YES! You read that right – Daisy peed on her own this morning and tonight, and they were good long ones in a normal squatting position! Shout it from the rooftops – Houston, we have pee-off! 😀 😀 😀

This is the best Christmas present we could ever get; it’s truly an answer to our prayers. I can’t tell you how ecstatic we are! All your prayers, POTP and positive thoughts helped so much; and now our dear friend Easy can at long last uncross his tightly crossed POTP paws that were praying for Daisy’s “yellow river” to arrive – what a relief for him! 🙂

Minutes before the momentous occasion - have you ever seen so much human support surrounding one tiny pup? LOL

Minutes before the momentous occasion – have you ever seen so much human support surrounding one tiny pup? LOL

AND – as if that’s not enough – Daisy most definitely used her left leg today, both to balance and to walk! Up until now that left leg was hanging at frighteningly awkward angles when she stood or lying like a limp, broken noodle underneath her, sometimes dangling in front of her right leg and tripping her when she tried walking, which is why we had to hold her back end up with the sling so that only her toes touched the ground. But today, look at this stance!

Look at that balance!! Her back legs are actually spread and the left leg is solidly on the ground. :D

Look at that balance!! Her back legs are actually spread and the left leg is solidly on the ground. 😀

The sling is relaxed - not holding her up at all and she's holding her own - STILL STANDING!! :D :D

The sling is relaxed – not holding her up at all and she’s holding her own – STILL STANDING!! 😀 😀

She’s very excited to come out of the crate to go outside twice a day, and she seems to want to stay outside for as long as we’ll let her. But we’re still under strict orders from the neurosurgeon not to let her walk much, so we’ll just stay with the program until our appointment with the neurosurgeon on Monday.

I missed posting yesterday because I spent hours out of the house, making up for the past week of doing nothing but helping DD take care of Daisy’s needs (DD is proving to be a super amazing pup-nurse!) – and I wouldn’t have had it any other way. But I’m behind in everything and yesterday was just a start at trying to catch up.

Day 8 (Backtracking, written late Monday night)
On Monday we saw yet another improvement in Daisy – she did a couple of big stretches in a sitting position, stretching her head straight up long and hard. We were thrilled! She’s also using her left back thigh muscle a little more when we take her outside. We’re hoping that will lead to her being able to squat soon because the vet now wants her to pee twice a day, not just once. We know that’s better for her, but all this time we’ve been told that once a day was all that was needed. Now he says she needs to pee every 8-12 hours, which would mean two trips down to the hospital. It’s 25 minutes each way, which doesn’t sound bad until you do it every single night and are then faced with doing it every morning plus every night – add it up and it’s almost 2 hours of travel time per day (without any traffic delays – we have to take two highways). And the morning run would be during work hours, which is impossible.

So getting her to go is now reaching a crisis point. The vet says that by just going once a day, she’s still facing a risk of infection AND a risk of having a distended bladder.

In better news though, she’s sitting up even more often – always to eat and sometimes to get lovies or just to say hello. 🙂

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Canine Disk Surgery Recovery Journal – Day 7

Yep, it’s one solid week – 7 days – since we brought our sweet girl home from the hospital. In that time we’ve really seen marked improvement in many areas.

DD took Daisy outside for a little more time twice today and tried a couple more of her favorite sniffing areas, but still no results. I noticed from when Daisy was a puppy that she was stubborn, and she is – she doesn’t like doing things differently, so she’ll just put her little paw down and flatly refuse. And unfortunately peeing with a lame leg and a sling around her seems to be one of those “different” things that make her refused to pee. The only reason she poops at the vet’s is because she’s so upset at being there, it literally scares the crap right out of her (sorry for the crudeness!); however, today she did a small one after DD tried expressing her. Sometimes that seems to stimulate her bowels – either that or the sheer fear of being expressed produces one! Anyway, looks like we’ll be making yet another trip to the vet tonight. ::sigh:: I can’t even tell you how stressful this has become.

She did a mini half-shake today, which is another new improvement. Shaking was something Daisy had a hard time doing before her surgery, so the fact that she gave it a try and was able to do half a shake is positive. Isn’t it amazing how the little ordinary things become so extraordinary and noteworthy at times like these?

Almost a complete curl!

Almost a complete curl! And looking very much more normal. 🙂

Evening update: It was back to the vet for expressing, but we had another encouraging sign: when DD opened the crate door to lift Daisy out, she sat up, then started moving toward the open door on her own! She stood up on “all threes” – still not wanting to use that lame leg – but she’s never shown a desire to push herself up or walk out the door of the crate. We were so excited about that!

So really it’s the whole bathroom issue that remains, otherwise we’re on a good track. But two funny things – while waiting at the vet’s, a couple came in to pick up their cat…named Monster! What mischief that kitty must get up to! And also, when I went up to the receptionist when we got there, a vet tech passing by looked at me and said, “Daisy, right?” I didn’t know whether to laugh or blush!

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Canine Disk Surgery Recovery Journal – Day 5

First of all I want to thank all you wonderful blogging friends who are sticking with us through this journey. It really helps to have your support and helpful comments; it makes us feel so much less isolated in our efforts to help Daisy. If Daisy could read, I know she’d send lickies to every single one of  you. 🙂

We started the day bright and early attacking the pee problem. DD and DH took Daisy out with the sling, all of us praying she would finally do what’s supposed to come naturally. But it was not to be. She doesn’t even sniff the ground, she just stands there like a statue. Nor did expressing help do anything but upset her.

However, we’re going to try a new approach around noon – we discovered that some dogs can be expressed while lying on their sides instead of standing up, so we’re going to try that. Maybe she’ll be more relaxed that way and her muscles won’t be so tight. The dog used in the video was a Havanese, which is half of what Daisy is, so maybe that’s not a coincidence!

The plan is to take her out to exercise her legs a little bit, which tends to tire her just a bit. Then we’ll bring her in and lie her down on a wee wee pad and put on the calming music we were using. We’ll pet her for a while and when she’s calm, we’ll try expressing, Maybe it’ll be less traumatic for her that way. Report to follow.

Daisy’s appetite is very good today, she’s now eating heartily on her own, we don’t have to feed her by hand one kibble at a time. Another good sign.

Hey, I remember this stuff! And with a dollop of pumpkin too - how gourmet!

Hey, I remember this stuff! And with a dollop of pumpkin too – how gourmet!

Afternoon update: Well, trying to express Daisy while lying down didn’t help. BUT – whatever DD did helped to push a poop out of her LOL! So it’s back down to the vet tonight. I really hope this doesn’t continue through the holidays! I’ll be changing the song “Have Yourself a Merry Little Christmas” to “Have Yourself a Merry Little Peemas”…please!!

Have you ever seen the Seinfeld episode where Elaine goes to the doctor for a rash and ends up with “Difficult” on her chart, and no doctor will see her in the entire city of New York? Well, we thought it was just a bit of TV fun, but now Daisy has “difficult” on her chart!! The vet we saw on Thursday night to express Daisy told us that “difficult to express” is on her chart AND she had SO much trouble finding Daisy’s bladder that she actually had to do an ultrasound to find it!! So even though we’re upset that we can’t help her, we don’t feel as bad as we did now that we know two experienced vets have also had a tough time!

Daisy went to the vet again tonight to be expressed again. I really hope this doesn’t last much longer; I certainly don’t want to be driving her there on Christmas or New Years Eve! But the vet thinks the Tramadol might be inhibiting her ability to pee and she really doesn’t seem to need it anymore, so he told us to stop giving it to her and see if that makes a difference. He said her motor functions are intact and there’s no physical or medical reason for her not to go. Tonight he expressed her outside to give her the idea that she needs to return to normal.

Another positive thing: when DH came home tonight, Daisy got excited to see him and excitedly maneuvered herself around in her crate to face the door so he could pet her – so quickly that we were afraid she was going to hurt herself. This is an improvement too, because up until now when he’d come home, she’d just look at him and wag her tail, sometimes just the tip. Tonight was a full-on greeting!

And finally – she’s becoming very alert to sounds and recognizing what they are. When she heard DD preparing her food, she perked her head up and held it there; she also sat up!

What's that? Do I hear dinner being served?

What’s that? Do I hear dinner being served?

Sitting up for about thirty seconds was more than she's done since her surgery eight days ago.

Sitting up for about thirty seconds was more than she’s done since her surgery.

Let’s see what the weekend brings!

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Canine Disk Surgery Recovery Journal: Day 1

First off, I can’t thank you all enough for your words of encouragement and support. When I feel low and painfully worried (which happens often), I reread all your kind words, and they really help. Thank you for always being here for us.

We’re journaling Daisy’s recovery, at first day-by-day so we can keep track of everything. Hopefully as the days go by, things will “normalize” and our updates won’t be quite as frequent. I hope to put up some “fun” posts in between!

Daisy’s surgery went well, she has a long incision down her back that we need to keep an eye on, but so far it’s doing well. If you hate seeing sewn-up incisions, scroll past this photo!

Daisy post op incision

There was a 95% chance of a positive outcome from the surgery, and Daisy is doing relatively well except for the fact that her back left leg isn’t working well yet. It’s just kind of hanging and flopping a bit, and when she’s lying down it’s in freaky positions, but the neurosurgeon said not to rearrange it. We weren’t sure if it was paralyzed, which really scared us, but today we saw her move it a little bit, so we’re hopeful.

Monday, 12/7 – First Full Day Home

Today felt about a week long, mostly because even though the hospital gave us great instructions and written information, there are always things that are different from what’s written as well as problems you run into along the way. We’re adjusting, but I feel like it’s going to be a very long 8 weeks. (Total healing could take a year or so.)

Calming the whining – We’re not hearing any of the horrible loud, constant crying and yiping or pathetic pained facial expressions that went on around the clock for two days after Daisy’s meniscus/ACL tear surgery. That’s what we were expecting this time. But it’s not as bad – there are extended periods of whining that sometimes get a bit louder. We did some research and discovered music specifically modulated to heal and calm dogs, created by a neurosurgeon along with a composer. The one we got is harp music (Harp of Hope: Animal Therapy Edition) – and it’s miraculous! We put it on when Daisy is whining and within five minutes, she’s in a deep sleep that lasts for a good half hour. There’s also piano music created the same way called Through a Dog’s Ear that will be our next purchase.

Daisy post op spine 1

Eating – For some reason, Daisy won’t chew her kibble. We can’t give her canned food because it gives her diarrhea, so we’re soaking her kibble to make it soft and mushy. One problem overcome! She won’t eat much, her appetite is affected by the pain, the meds, and her inactivity (which the vet said was normal), so we give her what she’ll take a few times a day. She eats about 10-20 pieces each time, and we’re happy just to see she has any appetite at all.

Meds – Daisy refuses to take her Tramadol pain med, even smothered in peanut butter or pumpkin. We tried mushing it into her softened kibble, but she’s actually sniffing each kibble and rejecting the one with the Tramadol – complete with a shiver when she smells it. We thought we’d gotten one into her this morning, but we discovered that this little sneak of ours had dropped it and laid on top of it, hiding it from us. She has had no pain medication since we brought her home Sunday afternoon. This is when its difficult to have a smart dog – they know exactly how to get around whatever they don’t want! We have been able to get the Prednisone into her, though. That Tramadol must taste horrible!

Going Potty – Nothing since we’ve brought her home. The neurosurgeon said that if she didn’t pee for any 24-hour period, we had to express her or she runs the risk of a UTI, plus a full bladder presses on the spine and causes more pain. This is something we’ve never done, so we watched some YouTube videos about it and also read the instructions the vet gave us. Of course, it did come down to this, but we couldn’t get it to work. So we had to run her back to the hospital tonight so they could show us what to do – fortunately they’re a 24-hour emergency hospital, so doctors are always there. They’re extremely compassionate and helpful – they encourage us to call any time of the day or night if we have questions or concerns, and to bring her in if we feel the need to have someone see her. I can’t tell you how comforting that is.

It wasn’t a pleasant experience with the expressing – the vet found that Daisy’s bladder was so overly full, it was dangerous. He showed DD how to express her – we’re supposed to be able to feel the bladder, but we can’t feel it (nor could he) because her abdomen muscles are so tight and firm. He helped DD do it, but Daisy yiped and screamed and even tried to bite him. It was horrible, but it got done. Now we’ll have to try to do it ourselves, but he told us that if we still have trouble with it, we can bring her in any time of the day or night. These doctors are truly a blessing for us.

Physical movement – Being confined to 8 weeks of strict crate rest doesn’t allow for much, but then again Daisy doesn’t want to move anyway. We have to use a sling on her back end and hold her so that only her hind toes touch the ground and her front legs do all the walking (of which there are only a few steps a day). Her left back leg is limp right now, but today we saw some encouraging small movements driven by the thigh muscle. She can’t put any weight on it at all, but clearly it’s not paralyzed. When she rearranges herself in her crate, she just kind of drags her back end around. We have faith that this will be temporary.

Daisy post op sling

We were told by the neurologist that improvements should happen by the week, not by the day. Yet we saw a couple of small improvements today already, so we’re very encouraged. We’re dreading having to express Daisy three times a day until she pees on her own, and like new parents, we’re still waiting for her first poop, which might not be until midweek.

Onward to Day 2 tomorrow.

 

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Daisy has taken a big turn for the worse; please pray for her

We’re asking our blogging friends for a lot of POTP right now. Daisy is in surgery for a severely misaligned and swollen disc. She’s only 5 years old.

For the past week she’s had back pain again and was on meds, but they didn’t do much good. Yesterday she could barely raise her hind quarters without great effort, and she preferred to lie in one spot for hours. Going down one tiny step to the outdoors made her screech.

We knew this wasn’t good. She was moving backward instead of forward, even on meds. We made an emergency appointment with our dear vet, who did some tests and discovered this was a neurological problem. It could be one of three things: a disc issue (bad but not impossible), a tumor (very bad), or a blood clot (the worst). He called an excellent neurologist and sent us straight over to her.

Her first assessment was that with high-powered meds and 8 weeks of crate rest, things could get better, but she could also become paralyzed suddenly. She would also run this risk for the rest of her life. Or we could opt for surgery, with a 95 percent chance of recovery. If Daisy were to become paralyzed, the odds went down to 50/50.

We authorized an MRI so we could make an educated decision; it showed a severely misaligned disc with a lot of swelling. At that point she pretty much took the choice away from us – without surgery, paralysis was a very real possibility and Daisy would definitely live her life in pain. Constant pain.

We wanted to avoid surgery at all costs, but we couldn’t. She’s in surgery now and if she does well, we bring her home Sunday for 8 weeks of crate rest (and some frightening things the surgeon said we’ll see, but we’ll talk about them as they happen).

Meanwhile we are praying harder than we ever have in our lives. We’re asking our wonderful blogging friends to send positive thoughts and prayers to Daisy for a successful surgery and full recovery. We need our sweet little girl to get through this and be her silly little self again. Nothing would be the same without her.

Daisy

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Daisy’s second follow-up vet visit

I’m SO, SO happy to report that Daisy turned a major corner last week and started walking more normally – she even tried to run and jump! She’s looking like her happy self again, her eyes are bright and she’s very interested in her toys. She even wants to climb on our laps for cuddles. 😀 😀 😀

I'm finally back where I belong! :)

I’m finally back where I belong! 🙂

Yesterday morning was her second follow-up vet visit and he was very pleased with her progress. We got THE smile from him that we were hoping for!

We still have to finish up the anti-inflammatory pills over the next two weeks and she’s still on “restricted activities” – no long walks, just several short outings per day, and no jumping EVER again. When we pick her up, we have to support her entire length and keep her level with the ground. We can live with that!

And even more good news is that she can have baths again (much to her chagrin and our absolute joy) – and boy does she need one, three weeks is far too long for Daisy! Especially since there were some pretty nasty 90+ degree days during that time. Her hair and nails are all overgrown, her hair is extra curly and feels more like a Berber carpet than a soft Havachon!

Oh no, not this again...

Oh no, not this again…

And we can pick her up and bring her onto the couch with us – we’ve all missed our Daisy cuddles, and she clearly did too. During her floor time these past weeks, when we’re on the couch, she’s restless and can’t settle herself for too long because she wants to be with us. She kept standing near us with big pleading eyes, a gently wagging tail and a soft whine. It was so hard to say no.

But why can't I come cuddle with you like I always do?

But why can’t I come cuddle with you like I always do?

Again, thank you all for your POTP, prayers, and well wishes. You helped us as much as you helped Daisy. Our blogging community is THE BEST! 🙂

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